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Manufactory commercial photographic equipment and cinema equipment

Manufactory commercial photographic equipment and cinema equipment

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This classification includes establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing photographic apparatus, equipment, parts, attachments, and accessories utilized in both still and motion photography. Also covered in this classification are establishments primarily involved in manufacturing photocopy and microfilm equipment, blueprinting and diazotype white printing apparatus and equipment, sensitized film, paper, cloth, and plates, and prepared photographic chemicals.

Those establishments involved in manufacturing products that are related to the photographic industry, but are not grouped in the photographic equipment and supplies classification, include manufacturers of unsensitized photographic paper stock, and paper mats, mounts, easels, and folders utilized for photographic purposes. These establishments are classified within the paper and allied products industry. Photographic lens manufacturers are classified in SIC Optical Instruments and Lenses, and manufacturers of photographic glass are delineated in the stone, clay, glass, and concrete products industry.

Also excluded are manufacturers of chemicals produced for technical purposes that are not specifically prepared and packaged for use in photography and those manufacturing photographic flash, flood, enlarger, and projection lamp bulbs. The former are classified within chemicals and allied products, and the latter are classified in SIC Electric Lamp Bulbs and Tubes. About 31 percent of these establishments employed at least 20 people.

The largest concentrations of facilities in this classification were in California, Illinois, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Growth in the photographic equipment and supplies industry was usually fueled by the introduction of new products that featured innovative technology.

In addition, when people bought still and motion camera equipment, they also tended to buy film and related supplies. Because most photographic equipment and supplies were considered leisure or nonessential goods, the industry was particularly sensitive to economic conditions. The industry produced such a broad range of goods, however, that it was somewhat insulated from market fluctuations. For example, still picture film and photocopying equipment typically sold consistently despite economic downturns.

The driving factor in this sector in the early s was digital, with digital cameras getting ever smaller, simpler, more powerful, and less expensive. In , there were 2. By , digital was catching traditional cameras fast, with approximately 9. People embraced digital for a number of reasons, including never before offered options like previewing or erasing photos, the ability to download photos directly to a computer for e-mailing or storing to an online album, and capturing high resolution, quality images.

Digital camcorders and printers were also getting more advanced, less expensive, and more popular. The photographic equipment and supplies industry was comprised mostly of small manufacturing operations.

In the late s, most of the facilities had been concentrated in the mid-Atlantic states, but by the early s the industry was beginning to spread out across the country.

Although photographic equipment and supplies first became available to consumers in the s, it was not until the s that the industry's sales grew rapidly. This was a defining decade for the photographic industry, characterized by a significant increase in consumers' disposable income, the emergence of photocopying and microfilming products as lucrative components within the industry, and the development of still cameras that were easy to operate. Many of the technological achievements that eventually led to this growth surge were accomplished by Eastman Kodak Company.

In the late s, Kodak's founder, George Eastman, had adapted a photographic process that replaced wet-plate developing chemicals and equipment with a dry-plate process. Cleaner to operate and generally easier to use than wet-plate cameras, Eastman's dry-plate system was the first step toward making photographic equipment available to all consumers.

Eastman said he intended to make the camera affordable and "as convenient as the pencil. To interest consumers in photography, manufacturers of this era improved the performance of cameras and the quality of film. A giant leap toward this goal was taken in when Kodak introduced the first model of its popular, inexpensive, and easy-to-operate Brownie line of cameras. Kodak later developed products to diversify the applications of photographic equipment.

The first 8 millimeter mm motion picture system designed for the amateur photographer entered the market in , followed by color film three years later. Additional products that were intended to spark interest in amateur photography soon emerged, but after World War II they were overshadowed by the introduction of film that could be developed instantly. The inventor of this new film-development process was Dr. Edwin H. Land, the founder of Polaroid Corporation.

Launched in , the first instant camera and film marked the beginning of Polaroid's rise toward multibillion dollar sales. Meanwhile, manufacturers improved their products, consumers grew accustomed to using photographic equipment, and the economic and population boom of the s ignited photographic sales.

This was partly attributable to the robust national economy following the war, which provided consumers with more money to spend on photography. The high birth rate was also a factor, because parents often purchased cameras and film to photograph their children—the subject of approximately 55 percent of the 2. Kodak held a virtual monopoly of the photographic industry from the turn of the century through this period, perennially controlling roughly 90 percent of the film market and an overwhelming share of the camera market.

In the early s, the federal government filed an antitrust suit against Kodak that resulted in a consent decree in Part of Kodak's dominance before the decree was attributable to a film-processing fee that was automatically included with every Kodak film purchase. By including a built-in processing fee, Kodak in effect cornered the processing end of the industry and consequently discouraged any competition for its film manufacturing business, because the dearth of alternative processing facilities inhibited film sales by other manufacturers.

This practice ended in , however, when Kodak agreed to sell film without a processing charge and to license other processing companies to develop Kodak film and prints. Although Kodak maintained its grip on the industry, other companies began to enter a market that had been essentially closed to competition. Meanwhile, competitors were scurrying to secure a foothold in the fledgling photocopying market, which also promised to be a lucrative enterprise.

Photocopiers were primarily targeted toward industrial users during the s, but new technology enabled manufacturers to make smaller machines suitable for the business community.

Each of the market leaders manufactured photocopiers that operated on a different photocopying process. Controlling roughly one third of the market each, Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing and Kodak used thermofax and verifax processes, respectively.

American Photocopy Equipment Company, the third-largest manufacturer, used a diffusion transfer process. In the end, however, these types proved inferior to the process marketed by Xerox Corporation. Xerography featured electrostatic dry copying that replaced the chemicals used in the other photocopying machines with a cleaner process that required no specially manufactured paper. Photocopiers that used xerography grew from 1 percent of Xerox's total sales in to more than 60 percent in , causing exponential growth throughout the industry.

The pace of this growth quickened with the introduction of the Xerox office copier in , which enabled rapid duplication of documents for business offices, a task that previously had to be completed manually.

By this time the market was heavily contested among more than competitors. Many were still not convinced of xerography's merits and continued to manufacture wettype machines. This issue was soon settled by the response of the industry's business customers, and photocopiers rapidly became an indispensable accessory for nearly every office in the United States.

Meanwhile in the photographic market, another innovative product emerged—the Instamatic camera. First marketed by Kodak in , the Instamatic camera and film formed an integrated system that made photography simpler for consumers.

A film cartridge popped into the camera's back, eliminating the task of threading film into the camera. The camera featured a rapid-action lever that advanced the film and automatically positioned it for each exposure, eliminating the inaccurate and awkward winding knob found on earlier cameras.

Some innovations of the camera and film had been developed as far back as the s, but never before had so many convenient features been combined into a single product. Mysteriously named Project 13, the development of Kodak's Instamatic was shrouded in secrecy, catching all of its competitors by surprise and heightening the camera's popularity.

Within two years approximately 7. Kodak estimated that the average camera owner purchased four rolls of film a year, but with the easy-to-use Instamatic, consumers increased their purchases to eight rolls a year.

During this time, the photographic industry also experienced a considerable boost from industrial and government purchases. As photographic technology advanced, the useful applications of photographic equipment in factories and for high technology purposes broadened, making the development of more sophisticated products almost as lucrative as the development of simple products.

Equipment that could take as many as 5, photographs per second was used to identify product inconsistencies occurring along production lines and to improve the design of industrial products. Cameras were also used inside missiles to photograph foreign countries for military purposes, inside layer cakes to improve leavening agents manufactured by chemical companies, and aboard rockets to record details of the moon's surface. In Xerox followed the model with a smaller version, the , and subsequent models entered the market throughout the rest of the decade.

Photocopying technology advanced rapidly during these years, increasing the production output of the machines and reducing their size, which heightened the popularity of photocopiers in business and government offices.

In Xerox began marketing the Model photocopier, which churned out 45 copies a minute, or 2, an hour, compared to the approximately 1, copies the could produce in a day. Its two paper trays could hold different sizes and types of paper, and it could automatically copy to both sides of a sheet of paper. Xerox was not the only pioneer in the photocopying equipment market, however, and consumer demand increased as other manufacturers developed attractive features for their machines.

This meant more revenue for industry participants and more competition from companies in related businesses. Competition intensified for the remainder of the decade, and Xerox began to cede a large portion of its commanding lead to domestic and foreign competitors.

The microfilm market also expanded during the early s, fueled by the growing popularity of computers in business and government. Computers became capable of storing massive amounts of data. One reel of magnetic computer tape stored enough information to fill 3, pages of paper, a task that took impact printers nearly four hours to complete.

This new technology proved a perfect match for micrographic technology's ability to reduce documents to a fraction of their original size, because the same amount of information could be placed on microfilm in 12 minutes. This process, a fusion of micrographics and computer technology known as computer-output microfilm COM , eventually boosted the microfilm market considerably. Sales were sluggish until Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing and Kodak, two of the leading companies in the microfilm market, opened a successful network of regional COM centers in The nation was producing and storing documents at an accelerating rate.

Bank checks were microfilmed, newspapers and periodicals were microfilmed for storage in libraries, and many businesses needed to consolidate the plethora of documents they produced each year. This decade established the foundation for future growth as computer usage became more pervasive and the nation moved into the information age. Instead of putting information onto microfilm, they would scan it into digital format to be placed onto a CD-ROM.

This allowed consumers to store more information on a disk and to access and print it faster with a personal computer. Entering the s, manufacturers of conventional film, paper, and cameras began to suffer the effects of a saturated market and foreign competition. Nearly every industry leader reorganized extensively to capitalize on the trend toward electronic imaging products. Several products that featured the new technology emerged in the mids, including Sony Corporation's electronic still camera called the Mavica, Canon Incorporated's Xapshot, and Fuji Photo Film Company's Fujix, but sales were disappointing.

One product that did sell well, however, was the camcorder, which was introduced in By , unit sales exceeded three million. By the mids electronic imaging was dramatically changing the photographic equipment and supplies industry. This new technology used semiconductor sensors instead of film to record images and then displayed the images on television screens or computer monitors rather than paper.

Although some worried that the new format would entirely supplant conventional photographic equipment and supplies, others predicted that electronic imaging would merely augment the existing market. Initially, electronic imaging products were prohibitively expensive, and the quality of images was far inferior to what could be achieved with film, but by the late s the digital field began to explode. The new hand-held digital cameras had relatively poor resolution but gained popularity quickly, with sales of digital equipment doubling annually.

In , , digital cameras were sold. That number jumped to 1.

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Currently, Canon is in the midst of a grand strategic transformation designed to accelerate growth in our four new businesses. OLED panels, used for smartphones and televisions, offer such advantages as high image quality, outstanding black levels and low power consumption. With technological advancements enabling thinner and even bendable OLED panels, the growing demand is expected to continue. In collaboration with Group companies Canon ANELVA and Canon Machinery, Canon Tokki conducts manufacturing, installation and maintenance services while undertaking the development of new equipment that will make possible higher definition and raise productivity. Canon Machinery holds a large share of the market for die bonders, which are used for bonding semiconductor die to a substrate. The company is also a leader in factory automation, manufacturing such custom equipment as automated assembly lines for lithium-ion batteries.

List of photographic equipment makers

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SIC Industry Description

The photography equipment market is projected to grow at the CAGR of 6. However, within last few years, many non-professional photographers, especially millennial have started buying photography equipment like cameras, different type of lenses, and others owing to increasing interest in photography and growing trend of sharing professional-like photographs on social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram, and others. Currently, the market is foreseeing high demand for high-quality cameras with integrated modern technology. Thus, many players are launching premium photography equipment which use innovative technology. The growing popularity of online retailing is increasingly making it easier for professional and non-professional photographers to browse and purchase from a wide range of photography equipment available online. Consumers have an option to choose photography equipment that matches their requirements and is compatible with the digital camera that they own. Further, online retailing is making the overall shopping experience easier, and the ability to market and sell these products online opens up new avenues for large number of vendors to expand their business in terms of product availability and accessibility.

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Provide Feedback. Manufacturer of standard and custom photographic supplies, specifically tapes. Offers duct, gaffer's and masking tapes. Features include heat and water resistance, synthetic rubber adhesive, matte finish, and hand tear ability. Die cutting and printing services are available. Also offers duct and gaffer's and uncoated cloth tapes. Provides design, prototyping, product return, and warranty. ISO certified manufacturer of water heaters, boilers, and tanks. Materials used for bellows include black vinyl impregnated with neoprene.

SIC Code 3861 - Photographic Equipment and Supplies

Companies in this industry manufacture photographic and optical equipment and supplies, such as cameras, photocopiers, projectors, and film editing equipment, as well as lenses used in scientific instruments and consumer products. This industry does not include companies that primarily manufacture eyeglasses or other ophthalmic lenses, which are covered in the Eyewear Manufacturing profile. The profitability of individual companies depends on product innovation, raw materials costs, and effective pricing.

Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing: 1 photographic apparatus, equipment, parts, attachments, and accessories, such as still and motion picture camera and projection apparatus; photocopy and microfilm equipment; blueprinting and diazotype white printing apparatus and equipment; and other photographic equipment; and 2 sensitized film, paper, cloth, and plates, and prepared photographic chemicals for use therewith. There are companies classified in this industry in the USA with an estimated employment of 6, people.

By Land began to use polarized material in sunglasses and other optical devices, and in the company was incorporated under the Polaroid name. After World War II , Land began to research an instantaneous developing film, and in the company brought out the Polaroid Land camera , which delivered a finished sepia-toned print 60 seconds after exposure. In the s the cameras were refined to produce black-and-white prints in 15 seconds; in the s a colour-developing process and film cartridges were introduced. The company introduced the compact Polaroid SX in In addition to further technical refinements, the SX combined both negative and positive prints in a single sheet. Instant motion pictures were introduced in After Land retired as chief executive officer in , Polaroid continued to develop new products for professional, technical, and consumer markets. These included cameras, high-speed film, floppy disks, medical equipment, colour-transparency films, transparent cameras, and identity verification equipment for security systems. In the s Polaroid delivered more firsts to the industry, including cameras with picture-storage compartments, and introduced several products that were worldwide best sellers, such as the redesigned Polaroid OneStep camera.

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Industrial equipment

This classification includes establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing photographic apparatus, equipment, parts, attachments, and accessories utilized in both still and motion photography. Also covered in this classification are establishments primarily involved in manufacturing photocopy and microfilm equipment, blueprinting and diazotype white printing apparatus and equipment, sensitized film, paper, cloth, and plates, and prepared photographic chemicals. Those establishments involved in manufacturing products that are related to the photographic industry, but are not grouped in the photographic equipment and supplies classification, include manufacturers of unsensitized photographic paper stock, and paper mats, mounts, easels, and folders utilized for photographic purposes. These establishments are classified within the paper and allied products industry. Photographic lens manufacturers are classified in SIC Optical Instruments and Lenses, and manufacturers of photographic glass are delineated in the stone, clay, glass, and concrete products industry. Also excluded are manufacturers of chemicals produced for technical purposes that are not specifically prepared and packaged for use in photography and those manufacturing photographic flash, flood, enlarger, and projection lamp bulbs. The former are classified within chemicals and allied products, and the latter are classified in SIC Electric Lamp Bulbs and Tubes. About 31 percent of these establishments employed at least 20 people.

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Photographic & Optical Equipment/Supplies Manufacturing Industry Profile

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NAICS Code Description

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